How High Can Killer Whales Jump? – A Possible Answer

One of the most exciting questions in aviation and underwater research is how high can killer whales jump? Killer whales are among our great marine mammals; they are known as the largest killer fish. Some have suggested that they can jump thousands of feet, which would put their jumping ability close to that of the giraffe. If they can do it, then the question becomes how high can killer whales jump?

how high can killer whales jump

There are a number of factors that come into play when we attempt to answer the question “How high can killer whales jump?” First, we must take into consideration their weight. The largest killer whales can weigh upwards of thirty tons. Obviously, then, if a whale has to jump very high to catch a prey item, it is unlikely it will be a light weight.

There is also the matter of air pressure. Just as the surface air pressure is different from the atmosphere above it, so too is the pressure of the water that the whales are jumping out of. A lot of experiments with compressed air have proven that it can jump long distances. However, only in the case of very heavy air; not for the air that comes out of a balloon or airplane. Also, it takes quite a bit of force to cause an aircraft to jump.

Finally, there are issues of buoyancy. Killer whales have very large brains, much larger than the brains of most birds. Air is much heavier than water; therefore, it takes much more energy to lift an animal. In fact, some suggest that an average size plane could lift only one or two passengers. So, given this information, it is likely that an animal such as a hippopotamus, which has relatively small brains, could indeed jump the distance.

Now, the question is, how high can killer whales jump? Assuming they can, that is. It seems likely that they would be able to do it, considering the size and shape of their bodies; and considering the amount of energy it would require. We may never know; however, the great joy of being able to watch these amazing creatures up close.

Note: The author is not a veterinarian, nor is he a scientific researcher. He is an avid lover of all things giant and insect. Please see the author’s website for more information on his books, DVDs and other information. Thanks!